AN INTRODUCTION TO HONG KONG

A few things to do taken from my first brush with this vibrant city. A long weekend is long enough to start to understand it’s character but to leave you wanting more.

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Climb Victoria Peak

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The walk up isn’t for the feint-hearted though nor, particularly, is the tram ride. I am terrified of heights and so spent the ‘white-knuckle’ ride staring resolutely forwards. From the top the views are famously spectacular. The walk that takes you the circumference of the peak is also well worth trying. It’s a couple of kilometres but is lush and refreshingly cool plus you get to see the view from a different perspective. Go early to enjoy it before the crowds.

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Wander the streets and local markets

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There are numerous buzzing food markets to be experienced but also some speciality markets that are unlike any I’ve seen. The flower market is lovely but others, like the bird market, I really didn’t enjoy.

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Try dim sum

Ding Dim 1968, 14 Elgin Street, Central, Hong Kong, China

 

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Make the most of happy hours

When we visited, sadly Brexit had taken it’s toll on the pound and we were feeling the impact in our back pocket. Everything felt painfully expensive so the near half-price happy hours that are not uncommon made for a welcome relief.

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A couple of our favourite places were…

Itchi – a laid-back bar in Sheung Wan with plenty of beers on tap, decent cocktails and tasty-looking bites.

186 Hollywood Road, Sheung Wan https://www.facebook.com/itchihk

Soirée – Loved the live music, their signature chocolate-rimmed daquiries must be tried. I’d recommend passionfruit!

19 Elgin St, Central, Hong Kong https://www.facebook.com/SoireeHK/

Take the ferry

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Locals use the crossing as a daily commute but for tourists, taking the ferry is an attraction in itself. You can, of course, travel by metro or road through the labyrinth of tunnels under the harbour but for something more historic, you can catch the Star Ferry for about 20p. TFL take note.

Take in the lights at night

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For something special, The Ritz Carlton in West Kowloon boasts the highest bar in the world. From the sky bar and terrace you can enjoy a view across the harbour and sip on a cocktail as the sun sets. Unsurprisingly, none of this comes cheap and, fair warning, the height does mean it’s not for the faint hearted, but it’s worth it just to say you’ve been.

 

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